Whole grains for a busy life

In my attempt to eat primarily whole grains, Iíve found a few shortcuts that make it possible to fit the longer cooking time into my busy work schedule.

First, I generally make a large pot of brown rice mixed with some millet at the beginning of the week. Iím not too exact about the ratio of rice to millet, but I generally try to make 3 cups total, usually a 1/2 cup of millet and 2 1/2 cups of brown rice. They cook together nicely, and the millet doesnít really change the flavor too much while adding a lot of nutrients. (It contains iron and some other helpful minerals, B vitamins and protein.) You can do this same thing with white rice to improve itís nutritional value without changing its taste too much.

This big pot of rice allows me to simply re-heat it any time I want some rice with a meal, without the 30+ minutes of cooking time.

My other favorite pre-cooked grain combo is a blend of quinoa, amaranth and millet. I generally make about 2 cups total, with roughly 1 cup of quinoa + 3/4 cup millet + 1/4 cup amaranth. These grains also cook nicely together in about 12 minutes (like white rice). Quinoa and amaranth have a heavy dose of high-quality protein (similar to egg white, which has the highest quality protein around), as well as large quantities of minerals (like iron and magnesium) and B vitamins. I generally use this grain blend as a breakfast porridge. I re-heat it in the morning with some soy milk, and add raisins, nuts, cocoa nibs and a bit of honey for a super-healthy, super-filling start to my day.

Both of these whole grain blends contain ample fiber and have a low glycemic index, making them filling, slow-burning energy generators.

Both blends cook well with a standard 2 parts water to 1 part grain ratio. For the brown rice, I generally add and additional 1/4 cup of water since it cooks longer. Itís important to add 1/2ñ1 teaspoon of salt to bring out the natural flavor of the grains.

These grains are also gluten-free and allergen free, so theyíre a good choice for people with food sensitivities.

For more information about the nutritional makeup of these grains, you can check Nutritiondata.com.

This entry was posted in Gluten Free Recipes, Meals, Recipes, Side dishes and tagged , , , , by cathy. Bookmark the permalink.

About cathy

Cathy Thomason, MAOM, Dipl.Ac., Dipl. CH, is a graduate of the master’s degree program of the New England School of Acupuncture. She is certified in both acupuncture and Chinese herbal medicine by the National Certification Commission for Acupuncture and Oriental Medicine (signified with Dipl.Ac. and Dipl.C.H.). Cathy has completed advanced herbal training with Dr. Tao Xie, and studied advanced needle technique with Dr. Cheng Xiao Ming. She became interested in studying acupuncture while living in South Korea, where acupuncture enjoys equal status with Western medicine.

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